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Fire Prevention and Preparedness

21. Oct, 2013

Every year there are between 350,000 and 400,000 reported fires that occur in private residencies. Of these fires that resulted in a loss of life, only 45% had a smoke detector installed. Preventing fires, having an escape plan, and ensuring your smoke alarms have fresh batteries are 3 simple steps that can save your life.

Have a place to meet:


When I was just a youngin’ my parents made sure the whole family knew our escape and meet plan. We did a practice drill of keeping low and getting out of the house, then we all met up by the mailbox at the end of our driveway. Make sure you and the people you care about know how to safely react to a fire and they they should never go back inside. Have an established meet up destination so you can count heads and stay out of the way for emergency personnel.

Check your smoke detectors:

There’s a little red button on the bottom of your smoke detector. Reach up and push it. If it beeps, then you’re good. If it doesn’t, then you need to replace the battery. Most take a 9 volt, which is the rectangular one with prongs at the end.

Prevent!

Kitchen

Most kitchen fires originate at the stove top or oven. Never leave your appliances unattended while they are running. A dish towel or curtain too close to the range can easily catch fire. Do not cook if you are sleepy or if it is late and you’ve been drinking.

Living and Bed Rooms

The two biggest causes of fires in your bedroom and living rooms are smoking and heating elements. If you a space heater, be sure to keep it a safe distance from from quilts and bedding. For heating pads and electric blankets, use a timer on the wall socket. Never smoke in bed or on your recliner in the evenings. You could fall asleep with a lit cigarette. Be sure to full extinguish your butts before throwing them into the trash, and even douse your ashtrays with water before pitching the contents.

Most people enjoy a good candle to bring out the season. Use a tip-resistant candle holder to prevent accidents. Just like kitchen appliances, never leave a lit candle unattended.

Outdoors

Most outdoor fires stem from yard waste and barbecue grills. Do not pile up leaves or brush next to your home, regardless of whether you plan to burn it or not. Barbecue grills should also be treated the same as kitchen appliances, and that is to never leave them alone when in use.

Fire Safety

Talk to your kids about fire safety. If you feel they at an appropriate age, teach them how to safely use matches, lighters, etc. Until then, keep all flammable materials high up and out of reach. If you notice evidence of your kids playing with matches or anything like that, intervene and talk about fire safety before they figure it out the hard way.

If you or someone you know experiences a loss due to fire or any other form of catastrophe, contact Complete DKI. We are on call 24/7/365 for all your disaster cleanup needs. Our courteous and professional staff will put you on the fast track to complete remediation so you can say, “it’s like it never even happened.”

Call us at 850.225.5354 for immediate response

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